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Celebrity

Bad by name; bad by nature?

Quote by Nelson Mandela

Source: "Long Walk To Freedom" by Nelson Mandela

During Nelson Mandela's 19 years imprisoned on Robben Island, one particular commanding officer was the most brutal of them all:

"A few days before Badenhorst's departure, I was called to the main office. General Steyn was visiting the island and wanted to know if we had any complaints. Badenhorst was there as I went through a list of demands. When I had finished, Badenhorst spoke to me directly.

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The Jim Abbott Story

New York Yankee Jim Abbott

-- Author unknown -- See highlight Video below

Jim Abbott has battled the odds his entire life. Despite being born with only one hand he was the 15th player to ever make a professional debut in the Major Leagues. Many considered the move a publicity stunt by manager Doug Rader, but after struggling early, Abbott proved his doubters wrong by winning 12 games with a 3.92 ERA in his rookie season.

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Behind gimpy Reed, Knicks make stand

Willis Reed in 1970 NBA Championship

Hobbled captain inspires club to '70 title.

By Bruce Lowitt


Hollywood could not have written a better ending: the old warrior coming to the aid of his comrades in arms for one final climactic battle.

Willis Reed played the role to perfection.

It was May 8, 1970, and the New York Knicks were staring defeat in the face -- Wilt Chamberlain's face -- in Game 7 of the NBA Finals against the Los Angeles Lakers. Reed, the Knicks center, their captain, their rock, appeared too hurt to play.

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Slam finishes off Hogan’s comeback

Ben Hogan 1950 Merion

Ben Hogan wins the British Open to complete his return to the top of his sport.

By Bruce Lowitt

He was far from the manicured courses at Augusta National in Georgia and the Oakmont Country Club in Pennsylvania. This was Carnoustie, where the wind and rain swept across the desolate fairways on the Scottish coast.

No matter. On July10, 1953, Ben Hogan tamed the course with a record final-round 4-under 68 to win the British Open and complete the first Triple Slam in golf's storied history.

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Remembering the ‘Miracle in Miami’

Doug Flutie celebrates with his brother

Doug Flutie threw a last-second TD pass to Gerard Phelan that gave Boston College a 47-45 win over Miami in 1984, one of the most memorable moments in University history.

By Reid Oslin

Dan Davis: Here's your ballgame, folks, as Flutie takes the snap...He drops straight back...has some time...Now he scrambles away from one hit...looks...uncorks a deep one for the end zone...Phelan is down there...

Gino Cappelletti: Oh, he got it!

Davis: Did he get it?

Cappelletti: He got it!

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Secretariat proves he’s a unique breed

Secretariat racing

By Bruce Lowitt


Realistically speaking, the 1973 Belmont Stakes wasn't a horse race -- unless you count the four thoroughbreds racing for second place. This third jewel of the Triple Crown was the coronation of Secretariat as the greatest race horse of all time.

He had won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness, each time beating Sham by 21/2 lengths.

Now it was June9. Most of the bettors in the crowd of nearly 70,000 at Belmont Park expected the first Triple Crown winner since Citation in 1948. Secretariat was a 1-10 favorite.

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A Gift of Peace and Hope

Music of a Christmas Song

The story behind the carol, "I Heard The Bells on Christmas Day"

-- Author unknown

Tragedy struck the home of America's most popular poet.  On July 9, 1861, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's wife, Fanny, was near an open window sealing locks of her daughter's hair in a packet, using hot sealing wax.  It was never known whether a spark from a match or the sealing wax was the cause, but suddenly her dress caught fire and engulfed her with flames.  Her husband, sleeping in the next room, was awakened by her screams.  He desperately tried to put out the fire and save his wife. He was severely burned on his face and hands.

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